Volume 8, Issue 1, February 2019, Page: 1-4
Rainfall Estimation Using Commercial Microwave Links (CMLs) Attenuations: Analyse of Extreme Event of 1st September 2009 in Ouagadougou
Ali Doumounia, Department of Physical Sciences, Institute of Sciences, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; Department of Physics, University Ouaga1 Pr Joseph Ki-zebo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Moumouni Sawadogo, Department of Physics, University Ouaga1 Pr Joseph Ki-zebo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; Department of Project Services / Telecel-Faso Roll-Out, Technical Direction of Telecel Faso, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Serge Roland Sanou, Department of Computer, Regulatory Authority for Electronic Telecommunications and Post, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
François Zougmoré, Department of Physics, University Ouaga1 Pr Joseph Ki-zebo, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Received: Oct. 16, 2017;       Accepted: Jan. 3, 2019;       Published: Jan. 24, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajep.20190801.11      View  39      Downloads  15
Abstract
With the exponential increasing of mobile phone users, the CML network in West Africa is growing, and thus providing a high potential for CML-derived precipitation measurements. In this work we use the performances data of the CMLs to determine the rainfall quantities of the rainy event which marked the memory of the inhabitants of the capital Ouagadougou on September 1st, 2009. In this study we use the attenuation of a microwave link to establish the rain rate. The working frequency is 13 GHz, the path length 7.5 Km and vertical polarization. The time series of attenuation are transformed into rain rates and compared with rain gauge data. The method has successful in quantifying the rainfall. The correlation between 1 hour data of the microwave link and the rain gauge is 0.63. The cumulative rainfall bias during the event less than 5%. These results demonstrate the opportunity to use the microwave backhauling in mobile network to assess rainfall in Africa in this context where the hydrometeorological risk increases every day.
Keywords
Precipitations, Attenuation, Telecommunications, Floods, Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE)
To cite this article
Ali Doumounia, Moumouni Sawadogo, Serge Roland Sanou, François Zougmoré, Rainfall Estimation Using Commercial Microwave Links (CMLs) Attenuations: Analyse of Extreme Event of 1st September 2009 in Ouagadougou, American Journal of Environmental Protection. Vol. 8, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.ajep.20190801.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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